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WHAT TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING YOUR FRONT DOOR

 

When it comes to choosing your entry door, whether it’s a new build or replacing an existing door, we have come up with four important considerations that anyone making that decision should weigh up. The four points are as follows; Materials, Styling, Sizing, and budget – we will now take a look at each in more detail.



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Materials

First off, it’s an obvious point that the material of the door is perhaps the most important factor of them all. You need to understand what weather conditions you will be facing and what exposure the door will have to the elements. The material you choose for your entry door will directly impact its durability, maintenance and appearance. If front door security is a major concern, composite/fibreglass or aluminium doors are generally considered stronger, particularly around the fixing points (hinges and lock areas).

The budget will be determined by your choice of material, so if your budget is your main constraint, it may be smart to begin with that and work backwards to see what it is you can afford.

Let’s go through material options available:

  • Wood: Solid timber doors made in Australia and New Zealand by local craftsmen from the finest quality timbers. Designed for use in weather protected areas.
  • Composite Fiberglass: Duramax Composite doors are composite engineered doors designed to withstand the extremes of New Zealand’s weather conditions, warranted 10 years.
  • Metal: Aluminium powder coated doors, durable in all-weather situations with the option for thermally enhanced doors featuring Thermtek technology, an innovation that is unique to Parkwood.

Styling

The appearance and layout of your home should play a big role in your choice of entry door styles. Depending on whether your entry area will determine whether timber may be an option or not. The colour palette of your home’s exterior should decide whether a simple choice of stained timber is an option, or whether either a neutral or bright accent colour is a better option to make it pop.

Beyond the colouring, actual front door designs should be decided by the style of your home. If it’s a traditionally country home design, a modern aluminium door would be a misfit. Make sure the style and colour blend in with the home’s design and boost its appeal, not detract from it and seem out of place.

Sizing

This determinant is a fairly simple one. You will have options between single doors, double doors and doors with window side panels. This choice will be decided by the size of the doorway you have – and whether it’s the entire door frame you need to replace, or just the door itself; either can be done. There are door replacement kits that make replacing just the door simple and easy.

Budget

If you are working within a limited budget, your door options will be considerably reduced.  Front door prices are extremely varied.  Timber doors are hands-down the more expensive option, with their rich beauty and authentic grains and stains that add a classic or rustic look to any home. Steel options are often your lower cost alternative and are extremely durable. Most can even come with insulated cores to help reduce your home expenses. Still, however, they are often limited on choices for design and appearance.

Duramax doors are the most common choice for their durability and reasonable pricing. Their value goes far beyond just how attractive are, they also have the highest thermal properties of all of our doors, not to mention all the colours we are able to finish them with, right here at Parkwood!

Make sure to consider each of the points above before making your final choice; the right decision will be critical to making the most out of your investment. If you have any unique circumstances, or just need some further information before making the final call, please reach out. The Parkwood team is ready and willing to help!


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